Category Archives: st john flora and fauna

Cashew

cashew
Cashew

St. John Live Music Schedule

Thursday 2/5

Aqua Bistro
T-Bird
5:30-8:30
340-776-5336

Beach Bar
Mitch Woods
9:00
340-777-4220

Banana Deck
Steel Pan
7:00 – 9:00
340-693-5055

Barefoot Cowboy Lounge
Erin Hart
8:00
340-201-1236

Concordia
From Broheem with Love
4:30 – 6:30
340-693-5855

Cruz Bay Landing
James
6:00-9:00
340-776-6908

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Flora of St. John: Wiss

St. JOhn Virgin Islands Environment: Wiss Vine
Wiss Vine

In Virgin Islands backtime days, whist was used for making rope. The vine was collected on the days of the dark moon. Three strands would be twisted until the end of the shortest was reaches then that strand would be knotted with the next one and so until the desired amount of rope was obtained. In some cases this called for a lot of whist like when used for setting fish pots when the rope needed to be 35 fathoms (210 feet) long.

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Sounds of the Night: St. John Tree Frogs

I have always enjoyed the melodious song of our tiny native tree frogs. The symphony begins around sunset and continues until dawn. It is a love symphony, meant for male frogs to attract the attention of nearby females.

Our island now hosts another species, the Cuban tree frog. They have a reputation of being toxic, even to the touch. Cannibals, they eat the native frogs, but worst of all is their abominable screeching.

 

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The Wild Tamarind Makes an Attractive Flower

St. John Flora: Wild Tamarind
Wild Tamarind Flower

On my website, I once wrote:

“I hate wild tamarind. They’re ugly, untidy and unruly. They spread rampantly and take over the place. They’re prejudiced and intolerant. They grow close together and won’t let any other plants live in their neighborhood.

They’re resilient and tenacious. Their sturdy taproot goes straight down into the earth and holds on tight. They can withstand drought, flood and even come back after a fire. There are no insects, predators or diseases that can cause them any significant harm.

They’re hard to get rid of. If you cut them down, they’ll grow right back. If you try and pull out the small one, you’d better have a lot of time and a lot of patience. If you try and dig out the big ones, you’d better have a good hoe-pick and a strong back.”

Nonetheless, their flower is kind of pretty!

The Ghost vs the Wild Tamarind

St. John and Virgin Islands News

Sahara Dust Impacts Territory
By Source Staff — May 28, 2014

Dust from the Sahara Desert has caused an air pollution alert to be issued for the U.S. Virgin Islands, according to Alicia Barnes, commissioner of the Department of Planning and Natural Resources.

The dust causes the skies around the Virgin Islands to be hazy, reducing visibility and resulting in poor air quality, Barnes said in a statement issued Tuesday night.

The cloud is raised from dust storms in Africa and a rise in the warm air. These sandy dust particles are transported by prevailing winds from the North African desert westward over the Atlantic Ocean across the Caribbean.

Carlos Anselmi, a meteorology intern at the National Weather Service in San Juan, Puerto Rico, confirmed that there are traces of Sahara dust over the territory and that the satellite indicates it will show a stronger presence over the next week.

While the haze may not be an immediate threat, people with allergies or respiratory ailments should remain indoors when possible and consult their physicians or health care professional for further guidance, Barnes warned.

Sahara dust storms pass through the region several times a year, but mainly in the spring and summer months. While the dust can be a nuisance and even a health threat, it is also known to hamper the development of tropical storms…. read more

 St. John Live Music Schedule

Barefoot Cowboy Lounge
Ike
6:30 -9:30
340-201-1236

Castaway’s
Karaoke Night
9:00 pm – 2:00 am
340-777-3316

Coconut Coast
St. John Flutes
5:30 -7:00
340-776-6944

Cruz Bay Landing
T-Bird
5:00 – 8:00
340-776-6908

High Tide
Lemuel Callwood Steel Pan
4:00 – 6:00
340-714-6169

Ocean Grill
David Laabs
6:30 – 9:30
340-693-3304

Pickles
Michael Beason Open Mic
6:00 – 9:00
340-776-6908

Rhumb Lines
Shane Meade & the Sound
7:00 – 10:00
340-776-0303

Shipwreck
Chris Carsel
7:00 – 10:00
340-693-5640

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St. John USVI Wildlife: Iguana Burrowing

Iguana burrowing in rocky soil – Chocolate Hole, St. John, Virgin Islands

On April 15, I wrote a blog in which I presented a photo of an iguana burrow, which I found in the sand by the boat ramps in Great Cruz Bay. At the time, I didn’t actually see the iguana making the hole.

Yesterday, however, I did catch an iguana in the act of burrowing and captured some of the project on video. This time it was in back of my house in Chocolate Hole, a more difficult endeavor for the iguana due to the rocky nature of the land. At one point it actually looked like the iguana was thinking about moving the big rock that was in its way.

St. John Live Music Schedule

Barefoot Cowboy Lounge
Erin Hart
6:30 – 9:30
340-201-1236

Beach Bar
Watson Roc feat Andy
9:00
777-4220

Castaway’s
Karaoke Night
9:00
340-777-3316

High Tide
Chris Carsel
6:00 9:00
340-714-6169

Inn at Tamarind Court
Steel Pan
6:30
340-776-6378

Island Blues
Karaoke
8:00
340-776-6800

La Tapa
Sambacombo
6:30 – 9:30
340-693-7755

Morgan’s Mango
Greg Kinslow
6:30 – 9:30
340-693-8141

Ocean Grill
Lauren Jones
6:00 – 9:00
340-693-3304

St. John USVI Weather

Isolated showers. Partly sunny, with a high near 82. East wind around 14 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

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A St. John Thief: The T’rushie Bird

Pearly-eyed thrasher
Thrushie in Mango Tree

The t’rushie bird is a teef! (For those of you who don’t know the word, teef: it’s St. Johnian for the noun, thief, as in one who steals, like in the t’rushie’s a teef. It can also be used as a verb meaning to steal like in the t’rushie teefed my mangoes.)

Anyone familiar with the thrushie or pearly-eyed trasher, or scientifically, Margarops fuscatus, and who has a fruit tree in their yard knows what a teef the thrushie is. The bird will hang around open air restaurants and steal the food off your plate if you’re not looking. On St. John, the outdoor Caneel Bay Beach Restaurant and the Trunk Bay snack bar have lines and wires placed to discourage the thrushies, but that doesn’t mean that it’s 100% successful in preventing the larcenies.

Not only does the thrushie steal from people, but it also steals from other birds, like taking their nests or eggs.

Thrushies live on the smaller islands of the Caribbean and the Bahamas and avoid the continent and the larger islands, with the exception of some remote areas of Puerto Rico. They are ugly. They build ugly sloppy, messy nests wherever they want, have an annoying sound and are general nuisances.

My mango tree is full of mangoes and the t’rushies are lying in wait hoping to get the ripe ones before I do. It will soon be war.

St. John Weather

Scattered showers, mainly before noon. Partly sunny, with a high near 82. East wind 9 to 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 50%. New precipitation amounts of less than a tenth of an inch possible.

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Mango Teef

flowers-9parrotIts springtime in the Virgin Islands and my mango tree is in the fullest bloom I’ve ever seen since it was planted some ten years or so ago. There are little baby mangoes and flowers all over the tree.

It’s a special tree. Anyone who knows about it will testify to the fact that it bears the best or t least one of the best mangoes on St. John.

This morning I hear something (someone?) high up in the tree branches and there is this parrot and its eating the baby mangoes, maldito loro! I hope its allergic.

St. John Live Music Schedule

Aqua Bistro
Lauren & Bo
3:30 – 6:30
340-776-5336

Asolare
David Laabs
5:30 -9:30.
340-779-4747

Beach Bar
John Sutton
9:00
340-777-4220

Concordia
Bo
10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
693-5855

High Tide
Lemuel Callwood Steel Pan
4:00 – 7:00
340-714-6169

Miss Lucy’s
Sambacombo
10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
693-5244

Ocean Grill
David Laabs
6:30 – 9:30
340-693-3304

Shipwreck Landing
Hot Club of Coral Bay
7:00 – 10:00
340-693-5640

Skinny Legs
Model Airplane
7:00
340-779-4982

Sun Dog
The Sunday Night Jam
Hosted by Patrick and friends
Dinner from 5:30 Music from 7-10 pm
340-693-8340

St. John Weather

Isolated showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 76. East wind around 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

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Bananaquit

“Yellow bird,
Up high in banana tree,
Yellow bird,
You sit all alone like me…”

St John US Virgin Islands birds: bananaquitThe bananaquit (Coereba flaveola), also called yellow bird, banana bird and sugar bird, is a commonly seen St. John resident.

Bananaquits will suck the nectar from flowers with their curved beaks and will also eat fruit and small insects.

The local Virgin Islands name, “sugar bird,” comes from the fact that setting out bowls of sugar easily attracts them.

Bananaquit Audio

St. John News

Idaho Olympians: Meet Slalom Skier Jasmine Campbell
Boise State Public Radio
By Tom Banse

Jasmine_CampbellTwenty-two-year-old Hailey resident Jasmine Campbell is headed to the 2014 Winter Olympics to compete for the U.S. Virgin Islands. Campbell was born on the Caribbean island and moved to Idaho when she was nine.

Campbell is a student at Whitman College, but she’s taking the year off to train for the Games. “It’s just basically an 18 hour job where I’m always thinking about skiing,” Campbell told the Northwest News Network. “I wake up in the morning, before going upstairs, I watch a ski video. When I go to bed at night I watch a ski video. During the day, I have double training sessions.”

JASMINE CAMPBELL
Hometown:  Hailey, Idaho
Sport:  Alpine skiing
Events:  Slalom and Giant Slalom
Birthdate:  Nov. 8, 1991
Team: U.S. Virgin Islands

Stats: Campbell is the one and only representative of the U.S. Virgin Islands at the 2014 Winter Olympics. She is the first skier from the tropical Caribbean territory to reach the podium in an international ski race, finishing 2nd and 3rd in giant slalom races in China this past December. As of late January, she was ranked 1097 in giant slalom and 1295 in slalom on the worldwide list maintained by the International Ski Federation.

Campbell on the 2014 Sochi Games: “It is a tremendous honor and privilege to compete in the Olympics. I want to ensure that I ski to the best of my ability so that I may represent my birthplace in the most honorable way possible.  At Sochi, I want to perform in a way that makes my countrymen proud, and gives the sport the respect and dedication it deserves,” says Campbell.

Why will she carry the Virgin Islands flag?: Campbell was born in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. Her family left the Caribbean for Sun Valley when she was 9-years-old. She started skiing soon after her arrival to Idaho. Theoretically, Campbell could have pursued an Olympic berth on either the U.S. Ski Team or Virgin Islands team, though the latter offered a more realistic route to Sochi. Her father, John Campbell, skied for the Virgin Islands in the 1992 Albertville Olympics.

Campbell is taking a year off between her junior and senior years at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington to pursue her Olympic dreams. At Whitman, she is double majoring in psychology and philosophy. “This Olympic odyssey may well have helped direct me to a potential career path in sports psychology,” Campbell says.

St. John Virgin Islands Events

Love City Live, St. John US Virgin Islands (USVI)Saturday, Jan. 25 – Beres Hammond “Live” in Concert at Winston Wells Ball Park (Cruz Bay – St. John) …also performing D Harmani, Unity Band, Fyah Train Band, Final Faze and The Echo People. Gates open at 4:30 p.m. Live performances begin at 5:30 p.m. Enjoy the full line-up of performing artists and our festival-like atmosphere of arts & crafts vendors, Ital/vegan food, Caribbean food, fresh coconut and premium bars. Get there early and “indulge” in the full island-roots experience.

St. John Weather

Isolated showers. Sunny, with a high near 77. East wind 16 to 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Update me when site is updated

Remoras

turtle and remoras
Hawksbill turtle and remoras at Honeymoon Bay

Remoras and Sea Turtles
Some cultures use remoras to catch turtles. A cord or rope is fastened to the remora’s tail, and when a turtle is sighted, the fish is released from the boat; it usually heads directly for the turtle and fastens itself to the turtle’s shell, and then both remora and turtle are hauled in. Smaller turtles can be pulled completely into the boat by this method, while larger ones are hauled within harpooning range. This practice has been reported throughout the Indian Ocean, especially from eastern Africa near Zanzibar and Mozambique, and from northern Australia near Cape York and Torres Strait.

Similar reports come from Japan and from the Americas. Some of the first records of the “fishing fish” in the Western literature come from the accounts of the second voyage of Christopher Columbus. However, Leo Wiener considers the Columbus accounts to be apocryphal: what was taken for accounts of the Americas may have been, in fact, notes Columbus derived from accounts of the East Indies, his desired destination…. read more about remoras

 

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