"St. John Off The Beaten Track" our top selling St. John guidebook
Powered by MaxBlogPress  

Posts Tagged “Caneel Bay”

St. John Virgin Islands Marine Life: needlefish

Needlefish (Tylosurus crocodilus)

Some years ago my friend, John Campbell, the father of Jasmine Campbell who represented the Virgin Islands in the Sochi Olympics, was water skiing in Rendezvous Bay. At precisely the wrong time, a needlefish jumped out of the water, its sharp beak colliding with John’s knee and penetrating deep into the joint. This led John on a quick trip to the clinic and a successful removal of the bony beak.

The needlefish, which range in length from one to 37 inches, can jump out of the water at speeds of up to 37 mph. making them a danger to humans that like my friend John happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. There have, in fact, been several recorded instances of needlefish causing deaths and injuries, especially during the night when the lights from boats excite the needlefish causing them to leap out of the water in the direction of the light. Night fishermen and divers in the Pacific find needlefish to be more of a danger than sharks.

A three-foot long needlefish killed a10-year-old Hawaiian boy who was night fishing with his father, the fish’s beak passing through the boy’s eye into his brain. A surfer in Hawaii suffered the same fate. A Vietnamese boy diving for sea cucumbers in 2007 was killed when the beak of a needlefish penetrated his heart. A snorkeler in Florida was nearly killed in the same manner and in 2012 a needlefish seriously injured the German kite surfer Wolfram Reiners in the Seychelles.

Needlefish swim close to the surface and survive on a diet of smaller fish. In the Virgin Islands, needlefish are often referred to as garfish, but, although somewhat similar in appearance, they are not related to that species.

St. John Live Music Schedule

Aqua Bistro
Lauren Jones
3:30 – 6:30
776-5336

High Tide
Steel Pan
Happy Hour 4:00 – 7:00
714-6169

Ocean Grill
David Laabs
6:30 – 9:30
693-3304

Shipwreck Landing
Hot Club of Coral Bay
6:30 – 9:30
693-5640

Skinny Legs
Groove Thang
6:00 – 9:00
779-4982

Sun Dog
Sunday Night Jam
6:30 – 9:30
693-8340

See Weekly Music Schedule

St. John Weather

Isolated showers. Mostly sunny, with a high near 77. East wind around 16 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

HIGH SURF ADVISORY

SEVEN FOOT SWELLS AT 12 SECONDS AT SAN JUAN BUOY 41053 WILL PRODUCE BREAKING WAVES OF 9 TO 12 FEET ALONG ALL COASTS OF PUERTO RICO…CULEBRA…VIEQUES AND ST THOMAS, ST. JOHN AND ADJACENT ISLANDS. SWELLS EXPECTED TO SUBSIDE QUICKLY EARLY THIS EVENING.

A HIGH SURF ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 4 PM AST THIS AFTERNOON.  WAVES AND SURF: BREAKING WAVES OF 9 TO 12 FEET FROM THE NORTH NORTHWEST.

TIMING: THROUGH 4 PM AST TODAY.

IMPACTS: LIMITED COASTAL EROSION AND DANGEROUS CONDITIONS   AROUND ROCKS AND REEFS.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…  A HIGH SURF ADVISORY MEANS THAT HIGH SURF WILL AFFECT BEACHES IN THE ADVISORY AREA…PRODUCING RIP CURRENTS AND LOCALIZED BEACH EROSION. HIGH SURF IS ESPECIALLY HAZARDOUS AT NIGHT. RESIDENTS AND VISITORS ARE URGED TO KEEP A SAFE DISTANCE FROM THE WATER.

Update me when site is updated

Comments Comments Off

cruz bay park

Cruz Bay Park 1975 – photo by Hannele Koivumak

A Description of St. John Written in 1925
“It is overgrown with herbage for cattle, with open woods of aromatic trees, thronged with beautiful birds. Views from breezy hilltops are unrivaled for magnificent panoramas of vividly green isles, countless beaches of cream- white sand, glittering surf, dark blue or green sea, and bright blue sky. Nature invites riding, hunting, fishing, bathing, boating and a free wild life. On ruined estates all over the island are old cannon, relics of days when buccaneers hid in the land-locked bays from French and Spanish cruisers. Regular communication with St. Thomas is maintained by several sloops.”
From the Geographic Dictionary of the Virgin Islands, compiled by J.W. McGuire for the Department of the Navy. The price of the book in 1925 was 25 cents.

 Development on St. John – A 1937 Perspective
“Several new roads were being cut up the hillsides and Agnes (Sewer) told us that Paul (Boulon) was beginning to erect a few cottages (at Trunk Bay) to rent to winter visitors; we knew he had the plan in mind but, at last, he was putting it into action…. Tourists were coming. Nice tourists, probably… but to our way of thinking, even five more white people on the north shore would destroy that splendid something that had made St. John a paradise and given us the two happiest years of our lives. The coming exploitation was inevitable, and it would be a good thing for a batch of black people who were very close to our hearts and for the white people that came, it would be marvelous. But for us it was ruined.”
From Escape to the Tropics, by Desmond and Bet Holdbridge, published in 1937.

 A Description of St. John Written in 1967
“…St John today looks very much as it must have looked to Columbus in 1493-green densely clad mountaintops rising steeply from the sea, with only an occasional glimpse of houses to spoil the illusion that the island is uninhabited. The two principal communities are Cruz Bay, the main port of entry, and Coral Bay. The total population is presently about 800, of which some fifty are Continentals who have made St. John their home.

The machine age came to St. John in 1948 when the first jeep was brought over from St. Thomas on a sloop. Now there are about forty jeeps on the island and a few dozen trucks. The island’s donkey population, after centuries of burden-carrying over the mountain roads, is virtually in retirement, except for those owned by families living in remote places where Jeeps still cannot go. Tourism is the main business of the island now, and the attractions of ready cash at the end of each week are more compelling to the islanders than the small gardens charcoal burning, and fishing of the past.

There are still elderly people who remember hearing their fathers talk of their days in the cane fields and who themselves remember the days of the Danes. The names of the old plantations – Carolina, Lameshur, Annaburg, Adrian-remain as constant reminders of the past. And the island itself, so long forgotten, has become a more important dot on the maps of the West Indies as one of the most distinctive of our national parks…”

This description of St. John was written by Ronald A. Morrisette, for the booklet, A Little Guide to the Island of St. John published by Caneel Bay Plantation. The booklet was sold at the Caneel Bay Gift Shop for $1.25.

St. John Live Music Schedule

Aqua Bistro
Lauren Jones
3:30 – 6:30
776-5336

High Tide
Steel Pan
Happy Hour 4:00 – 7:00
714-6169

Ocean Grill
David Laabs
6:30 – 9:30
693-3304

Shipwreck Landing
Hot Club of Coral Bay
6:30 – 9:30
693-5640

Sun Dog
Sunday Night Jam
6:30 – 9:30
693-8340

See Weekly Schedule

St. John Weather

Isolated showers. Sunny, with a high near 77. East wind 17 to 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Update me when site is updated

Comments Comments Off

Caneel Bay Overview

Caneel Bay Overview 1941 – photo by Jack Delano

After slavery was abolished, the sugar plantation at Caneel Bay declined and reverted to cattle grazing and subsistence farming.

In the 1930s, the West India Company of St. Thomas purchased the approximately 550-acre property. The company, appreciating the natural beauty of the bay, began to operate a modest resort, building three cottages, a small commissary and a narrow wooden dock. After that the company gradually constructed five additional cottages.

In 1935, the Virgin Islands Tourist Company bought the Caneel Bay Estate and the Grand Hotel on St. Thomas and began operation of the motor yacht, Flamingo, which provided service between St. Thomas and St. John. The company ran an advertisement for the resort reading:

Caneel Bay Plantation Resort

Bungalows for rent. Each Bungalow is a self-contained unit, two large rooms and a porch. Equipped withal modern comfort: Bathroom and toilet with running water, electricity installed throughout, radio, fully furnished with comfortable furniture, full supply of linen and towels. Separate kitchen with Frigidaire, oli range and complete equipment of kitchen utensils, silver and china.

Each Bungalow has its own swimming beach. Opportunities for a lovely vacation in unspoiled tropical surroundings with all the comforts of today.

Excellent opportunities for horse-back riding, swimming and fishing.

Operated in conjunction with the Grand Hotel, St. Thomas. Interchange of guests between Hotel and bungalows arranged,

Write: The Virgin Islands Tourist Company or the leading Travel Bureaus for further information and reservation.

In 1946, the property was acquired by the Trigo brothers from Puerto Rico and four more cottages were built bringing the total to twelve.

The Caneel Bay commissary was described in the 1960 book, Some True Tales and Legends about Caneel Bay, by Charlotte Dean Stark:

In the thirties and forties, the housekeeping cottages were for rent, all except #8, which was the manager’s cottage. Everything but food was included – electricity from the Caneel Bay Power Plant, all furnishings, and a St. John maid. Food was bought at the commissary by the maid, or by the lady if she felt like choosing her own groceries. The commissary was described by one visiting cottager as a little country store. Natives from all over the island, as well as the dozen or more cottage guests, bought there, as did the half dozen continental families then living on St. John.

There would sometimes be as many as twenty-five people all trying to buy at once. That was a crowd in those days.

During this time the resort raised cows, chickens and goats to supply meat, milk and eggs. Horses were also available for transportation to Cruz Bay and for use by resort guests.

The Trigo Brothers listed the property, along with its seven beautiful beaches and the profitable cottage colony for $75,000

Until Laurence Rockefeller obtained the estate in 1952, rumors abounded as to the ultimate fate of the parcel, some of which were prophetic.
In Desmond Holdridge’s 1937 account of life on St. John, Escape to the Tropics, he wrote:

Agnes (Agnes Sewer) said that some “Dane men” had bought Caneel Bay, a beautiful abandoned estate a couple of miles farther west, and were going to run it for tourists.

“”Bout sixty thousand people comin’, I expect,” said Agnes, happy thinking of the money, but sad thinking of the strangers and the changes they will make.

I reassured her.

“Not very many are coming, Agnes. Hjalmar Bang is doing it, and he is just going to build a few houses where white folks that enjoy privacy can live. No hotel, no hot dog stands, no nonsense. It won’t change very much.”

St John News and Happengs

Virgin Islands Daily News
Paddle the Park Race

ST. JOHN – The Friends of the Virgin Islands National Park’s Paddle the Park Race will take place from 9 a.m. to noon Sunday at Maho Bay Pavilion. (Note: the race has been postponed to November 9) This paddleboard race will consist of two concurrent courses: the OPEN course from Maho Bay to Whistling Cay and back (about 3 miles); and the ELITE course from Maho, around Whistling Cay, then around Cinnamon and back around Whistling Cay and back to Maho (about 5.5 miles).

Full details can be found on the Friends website.

Phone and online registration are open. Early registration fees (until today) are $60 for adults and $30 for youths under 18. Late registration (Saturday until 2 p.m. at the Friends of the Park Store only) are $80 for adults and $50 for youths. There will be no registration on the day of the event.

Participants may register online, by phone at 779-4940, or at the Friends of the Park store or office in Mongoose Junction, at Connections Cruz Bay or Coral Bay, or at Caribbean Surf Co. in Havensight or Red Hook.

NOAA Grant Helps with Sedimentation Research
By Lynda Lohr — November 2, 2013

Thanks to a $76,000 grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a study by a researcher from the University of San Diego on how sedimentation impacts coral reefs will continue on St. John.

San Diego marine sciences professor Sarah Gray started looking at sedimentation in the waters around St. John in 2007. While that work will continue with this grant, she said it also covers work by Carlos Ramos-Scharron of the University of Texas at Austin, who Gray said studies the runoff that enters each watershed impacting Coral Harbor.

“For the first time there is integration between marine sedimentation and watershed runoff,” she said.

Using Stimulus Funds grants, Gray and her team of students were able to determine that, at some sites in the Coral Harbor waters, sedimentation decreased after the Coral Bay Community Council installed sedimentation ponds, repaired roads and did other work to cut down on the amount of sediment that runs into Coral Harbor from the steep hillsides that surround it. The restoration work was done between 2009 and 2011.

Since then, there hasn’t been a large amount of rain, a fact that keeps visitors happy but doesn’t help the project… read more

 

Update me when site is updated

Comments Comments Off

Southern Stingray

Common stingray (Dasyatis pastinaca)

This common stingray is a sea creature we often get to see on St. John, swimming about close to the bottom in shallow waters. Although it possesses a stinging barb on it’s tail it is generally not a threat to human beings given the clear nature of the seawater  off of  St. John allowing the ray and the person to be aware of each other each one desiring to avoid contact. In less clear waters or in the case of mounds of sand with look suspiciously like a ray may be burrowed beneath, it’s recommended that waders use a shuffling motion when wading through the water, thus alerting the ray to the presence of a creature that might inadvertently step on them. Read more about stingrays

St. John News

Caneel Bay Says Goodbye to Management Company
By Lynda Lohr — September 3, 2013

Caneel Bay Resort will no longer have Rosewood Hotels and Resorts as its management company effective Oct. 13, managing director Nikolay Hotze said Tuesday. He said Caneel’s owners, CBI Acquisitions, decided not to renew the Rosewood contract. CBI will manage the resort itself.

“We feel confident with our marketing team,” Hotze said.

He said Caneel always had its own marketing team and partnered with other companies like American Express to get the Caneel name out to the public.

Chantal Figueroa, deputy commissioner at the territory’s Tourism Department, said that the Rosewood name was not linked in a major way to Caneel. The Rosewood name was never listed before Caneel’s as other hotel management companies often do and was marketed as Caneel Bay, a Rosewood Resort.

“Caneel stands on its own,” she said.

Caneel, which sits within V.I. National Park, opened at the same time as the park in 1956.

The management of Cinnamon Bay Campground and the concession at Trunk Bay Beach, both within the park, will remain with Caneel Bay, Hotze said.

Hotze said the Little Dix Bay property on Virgin Gorda in the British Virgin Islands will continue to be known as Rosewood Little Dix Bay because Rosewood owns that property.

Rosewood has been Caneel’s management company since 1993.

Hotze will remain in his current position. He said there will be no changes with the staff.

Caneel closed Aug. 26 for its annual fall maintenance. Hotze said soft goods are being refurbished and the gift shop is getting a complete facelift.

When the hotel reopens on Nov. 1, it will have a coffee and gelato shop called Cannella.

Zozo’s Restaurant, which was located at Gallows Point Resort in Cruz Bay, will relocate to Caneel’s sugar mill restaurant location. It will open Nov. 1.

 

 

Update me when site is updated

Comments Comments Off

Caneel Bay, St. John US Virgin Islands (USVI)

Caneel Bay Sunfish and Swim Raft

Update me when site is updated

Comments Comments Off

Caneel Bay, St. John US Virgin Islands (USVI)

Caneel Bay Sunday

St. John Events

Tomorrow Tuesday 05/07
St. John Film Society Presents:
Spotlight on Cuba
St. John School of the Arts

From the Traveling Caribbean Showcase of Films: 7:30 PM
“Old House”
by Lester Hamlet

Esteban’s return to Cuba to visit his dying father reveals truths and valuable life lessons for his entire family.

Preceded by the short animated film:

Cuban Missile Crisis
by Luciano

St. John Weather

Partly cloudy with thunderstorms and rain showers
High of 86 degrees F
Winds from the SE at 5 to 10 mph
Chance of rain 50%
Water Temperature (Charlotte Amalie Harbor, St. Thomas) 90 degrees F
Sunset: 6:42

St. John Live Music Schedule

Aqua Bistro
Matt Mitruk
5:30 – 8:30
776-5336

Barefoot Cowboy Lounge
T-Bird
7:00 – 9:00
201-1236

Beach Bar
Whistler and Wallace and Lockette
9:00
777-4220

Castaways
Trivia Night
8:00
777-3316

Concordia
Open Mic with Ben Marr
3:30 – 5:30

Island Blues
Live Local Reggae – Bongin
4:30 – 7:30
776-6800

La Tapa
Sambacombo
6:30 – 9:30
693-8141

Maho Bay Camp
Bo & Lauren
8:00

Ocean Grill
Chris Carsel
6:30 – 9:00
693-3304

See Weekly Schedule

Update me when site is updated

Comments Comments Off

Photo of Caneel Bay in 1941

Caneel Bay photo by Jack Delano 1941

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Photo of Caneel Bay Dock 1941

Caneel Bay Dock 1941 photo by Jack Delano

Caneel Bay
After slavery was abolished, the agriculturally oriented Caneel Bay plantation declined and reverted to cattle grazing and subsistence farming and was eventually purchased by the West India Company of St. Thomas.

During the 1930s, the company, appreciating the natural beauty of the bay, began to operate a modest resort building three cottages, a small commissary and a narrow wooden dock, after which five additional cottages were gradually added.

In the 1940s, the Trigo brothers from Puerto Rico acquired the property and constructed four more cottages bringing the total to twelve.

During this time the resort raised cows, chickens and goats to supply meat, milk and eggs. Horses were also available for transportation to Cruz Bay and for use by resort guests.

The Trigo Brothers listed the 500-acre property, along with its seven beautiful beaches and the profitable cottage colony for $75,000.

Describing, the Caneel Bay commissary in her 1960 book, Some True Tales and Legends about Caneel Bay, Charlotte Dean Stark wrote:

“In the thirties and forties, the housekeeping cottages were for rent, all except #8, which was the manager’s cottage. Everything but food was included – electricity from the Caneel Bay Power Plant, all furnishings, and a St. John maid. Food was bought at the commissary by the maid, or by the lady if she felt like choosing her own groceries. The commissary was described by one visiting cottager as a little country store. Natives from all over the island, as well as the dozen or more cottage guests, bought there, as did the half dozen continental families then living on St. John.

“There would sometimes be as many as twenty-five people all trying to buy at once. That was a crowd in those days.”

Virgin Islands News

Public Works Uncovers Historic Pre-Columbian Site on St. Thomas
By James Gardner — February 14, 2013

Archaeologists from all over the world could soon be descending on St. Thomas to explore a 2,000-year-old Pre-Columbian site found by the Department of Public Works while construction continued this week on the Rothschild Francis Square Enhancements project.

The site was discovered on Krondprindsens Gade (Main Street) between Strande and General Gades…. read more

Seaborne Expanding Service, Working with American Airlines
By Source Staff — February 13, 2013

Seaborne Airlines told customers this week that it has an “interline arrangement” with American Airlines that is part of its efforts to improve operations for connecting flights from St. Thomas and St. Croix to the mainland through Puerto Rico…. read more

St. John Weather

Partly cloudy with rain showers in the morning, then clear with rain showers
High of 79 degrees F
Winds from the NNW at 10 to 15 mph shifting to the East in the afternoon
Chance of rain 30%
Sunrise: 6:47 AM AST – Sunset: 6:19 PM AST
Water temperature: 82.9 degrees F

St. John Live Music Schedule – Thursday February 14

Banana Deck
Steel Pan by Lemuel Samuels
6:00 – 9:00
693-5055

Barefoot Cowboy Lounge
Erin Hart
7:00 – 9:00
201-1236

Castaways
James
9:00
777-3316

High Tide
Inner Vision
8:30
714-6169

Inn at Tamarind Court
To Mason & the Blues Buccaneers
7:00
776 6378

Miss Lucy’s
Jazz with Rich and Greg
6:00 – 9:00
693-5354

Morgan’s Mango
Mark Wallace
6:00 – 9:30
693-8141

Ocean Grill
Chris Carsel
6:30 – 9:00
693-3304

Rhumblines
Erin Hart
7:00 – 10:00

Skinny Legs
Lauren Jones Magnie
6:00
779 4982

Spyglass
James Milne
5:00 – 8:00
776-1100

See Weekly Schedule

Update me when site is updated

Comments Comments Off

St. John Trails: Tektite - Cabritte Horn Point

View from the Cabritte Horn Point Spur Trail


Where to Find the Best Views and Overlooks on St. John

St. John Overlooks: Caneel Bay

Caneel Bay Overlook

Today we’ll talk about ocean view overlooks. Not including that fantastic view from your own house or rented villa, the easiest to enjoy are those that can be had from highway overlooks, like the Caneel Bay Overlook, pictured on the right.

The second possibility for that island panorama experience are the overlooks to be found on the many trails throughout the interior of St. John, some easy to reach, some not so easy. Check out St. John Off the Beaten Track and Pam Gaffin’s, St. John Feet Fins & Four Wheel Drive for invaluable trail and island information.

Cabritte Horn Spur Trail
The Tektite Trail is probably the most scenic of all the St. John trails. Ones you get to the top of the first rise, you’ll be treated to view after spectacular view. While you’re on the Tektite Trail, be sure and take the opportunity hike the Cabritte Horn Spur whose awesome scenic overlooks will rival even the best ones on the main trail.

New St. John Website from Hillcrest Guest House
Link to Hillcrest Guest House Webcam

St John Live Music Schedule Thursday 12/6

Banana Deck
Steel Pan by Lemuel Samuels
6:00 – 9:00
693-5055

Barefoot Cowboy Lounge
Erin Hart
7:00 – 9:00
201-1236

Castaways
James
9:00
777-3316

Miss Lucy’s
Jazz with Rich and Greg
6:00 – 9:00
693-5354

Morgan’s Mango
Mark Wallace
6:00 – 9:30
693-8141

Ocean Grill
Chris Carsel
6:30 – 9:00
693-3304

Rhumblines
Erin Hart
7:00 – 10:00

Spyglass
James Milne
5:00 – 8:00
776-1100

Inn at Tamarind Court
Steel Pan
6:00 – 9:00
776-110

See Weekly Schedule

Update me when site is updated

Comments Comments Off

Caneel Bay Resort

Caneel Bay Terrace

Caneel Bay St. John US Virgin IslandsThe Caneel Bay Resort is a cool option if you would like to combine a day at the beach with an upscale lunch or enjoy a cocktail or two in a comfortable setting. Visitors to Caneel Bay are welcome to enjoy the main beach, but are asked to leave the lounge chairs and other hotel facilities for Caneel Bay guests. In addition, visitors will have access to the gift shop, the public restrooms, can hike the Caneel Bay trails and stroll through the restored ruins of plantation times. Visitors can also take advantage of VI Ecotours the new Beach Hut on Honeymoon Bay where they can rent beach chairs, snorkel equipment and standup paddleboards.

Caneel Bay estate ruinsNote: There is a $20.00 parking fee for vehicles entering Caneel Bay, which can be used towards purchases at the Caneel Bay restaurants or at the gift shop.

St. John Live Music Schedule – Sunday 11/11

Aqua Bistro
Lauren Jones
3:30 – 6:30
776-5336

Beach Bar
Treehouse
7:00 – 10:00
777-4220

Concordia
Bo
Sunday Brunch 10:00 am

Cruz Bay Prime
Mark Wallace
7:00 – 10:00
693 -8000

High Tide
Live Music
3:00 – 6:00
714-6169

Miss Lucy’s
Samba Combo
10:00 am – 2:00 pm
693-5254

Ocean Grill
David Laab
6:30 – 9:00
693-3304

Rhumblines
T-Bird
7:00 – 10:00

Shipwreck Landing
Live Music
7:00 – 10:00

Sun Dog Cafe
David Laab
11:00 am- 2:00 pm
244-9713

Update me when site is updated

Comments Comments Off

Fallen flowers of the Poui tree at St. John's Caneel Bay Resort

The wood of the Poui tree (Tabebuia chrysantha) is strong and durable and is resistant to dampness, decay, fire and termites. Consequently it has been used for docks, piers, outdoor furniture, park benches and boardwalks including the boardwalk in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

St. John Weather

Same thing but a different nuance:

From NOAA (glass half full)
Scattered showers, mainly before noon. Mostly sunny, with a high near 87.

From Weather Underground (glass half empty)
Overcast with rain showers in the morning, then partly cloudy with rain showers.

St. John Live Music Schedule Saturday May 12

Castaways – Dance Party – 11:00 – 777-3316
Driftwood Dave’s – Guitarist James Milne – 7:00 – 10:00 – 777-4015
Morgan’s Mango – Luba – 6:00 – 9:30 – 693-8141
Ocean Grill – Rascio on Steel Pan – 6:00 – 9:30 – 693-3304
Rhumblines – Lauren – 7:00 – 10:00
Shipwreck Landing – Mike Miknut – 6:00 – 9:30
Skinny Legs – Chis & Mo – 6:30 – 9:30 – 779-4982
Spyglass – James Cobb – 5:00 – 8:00 – 776-1100

Weekly Schedule

Update me when site is updated

Comments 2 Comments »

Brought to you by Gerald Singer, St. John US Virgin Islands (USVI)